Top College News Subscribe to the Newsletter

Top Story

es

With a song in his heart

Student uses social media to build fan base, share music

Ever since he was little and began singing in the mirrors of his mother’s room back in Mexico, Esteban Gonzalez has dreamt of becoming a musical icon. But it wasn’t until his freshman year of college that he decided to pursue that dream. “Ever since I was little, I always had the dream of becoming an artist,” Gonzalez said. Full story

Top Story

tj

Carrying ‘a great man’ in their hearts

Family, colleagues honor memory of former dean of technical education

Family, friends and former colleagues celebrated the legacy of a mentor whose positive attitude and approachable nature will forever be a part of who each of them is today. Gary E. Jarmer, Ph.D., former GCCC dean of technical education, died Feb. 18, 2014, at the age of 72, in Springfield, Mo. Full story

Top Story

Bryant

Bryant update: Off ventilator, in rehabilitation

Valleys and peaks best describe Garrett Bryant’s days and nights according to his mother, Sandie, as Garrett continues to progress after a fall down a flight of stairs  Jan. 26 left him in a medical coma. Bryant’s progress can be followed  through CaringBridge. Full story

Top Story

running

MAKING A RUN AT NATIONALS

Track, field qualifies 12 for National NJCAA Indoor meet

At the Region VI Indoor Track and Field Championships last Friday and Saturday, the Busters brought their A-game just at the right moment. After two days of event-packed competition, the Busters came home with fourth place on the men’s side and tenth place on the women’s side. Full story

Silhouette More »

Most Commented

More Silhouette

  • Netflix comedy 'Archer' brings "danger zone" humor, big laughs

    Archer Vice offering up laughs, cocaine, and craze in the fifth season of Archer.

  • Flight 370: Another headline-grabbing attempt by media desperate for ratings

    Since March 8, the families of 239 people on board Flight 370 out of Malaysia have been in agony praying that their loved ones will return home to them and since March 8, the media has been milking the tragedy dry. Day after day FOX, HLN, and CNN (probably MSNBC too, but nobody watches that) have been cheapening the term “news” and have essentially changed it to “what gets us ratings.

  • Campus artists do quality job, get very little recognition

    Art appreciation. Sounds like a class you would enroll in and then never show up for? Us, too, but at the heart of it art appreciation is something much different than a 2:30 class that seems to purposely try to make you doze off. Appreciating the arts is a form of taking pride in both GCCC and the community.

  • FHSU control over DCCC leaves an unclear future for the school

    A new educational entity will be taking over Dodge City Community College and will be offering new technical classes as well as a baccalaureate program.

    Last week the DCCC Board of Trustees voted to make DCCC a branch of Fort Hays State University. Director of University Relations at Fort Hays Kent Stewart said that the college will become an Institute of Applied Technology for the Hays, Kan., university.

    “What’s going to be created is an institution that has three components: the one component that is the same that already exists, the second component is the tech school that is going to be in partnership with corporations, and the third that is going to offer the baccalaureate programs,” Stewart said. “People would be able to get a four-year degree in Dodge City.”

    According to Stewart, students of the college could see a differential tuition while paying for their classes. This means that the students would pay more or less depended on what program they are a part. Regular classes through DCCC would most likely be the most affordable.

    Switching over to being a branch of FHSU will take several years for all administrative changes and structural changes to be made. According to Stewart, when this happens the former students who have earned their associate from DCCC will have their degrees threatened in any way.

    “I just can’t imagine that they would be diminished in any way,” Stewart said. “The institution is changing in its nature but it’s not disappearing. I don’t think anyone would find that any associate degree they earned would be harmed by this in any way.”

    Based on the White Paper -- the document detailing what will happen on the DCCC campus -- the current employees of DCCC will become FHSU employees. The DCCC President, however, will most likely be replaced by FHSU President Ed Hammond.

    The DCCC Board of Trustees approved a proposal to call for the state to spend roughly $10 million to build a new building to be used as a technology center.

    “It [the White Paper] calls for the Board of Trustees to continue operating athletics, support programs, and scholarships and would continue to own the actual campus,” Stewart said.

  • Endowment Association volunteers "All Ducked Out" for scholarships

    Today, the GCCC Endowment Association will be hosting their 36 annual GCCC Endowment Auction at the Finney County Exhibition Building (3i). The auction’s theme this year is “All Ducked Out” -- a play on the TV show “Duck Dynasty.” By enlisting the help of over 100 volunteers, the auction will commence at 6:30 p.